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By adamg - 9/20/22 - 1:46 pm
Ice Box in its heyday

The Ice Box in its heyday, when you could buy both ice and bottled water.

An auction in November could mean a new owner for the shuttered Ice Box, 3890 Washington St., where generations of Bostonians went when they needed a lot of ice. Read more.

By adamg - 9/12/22 - 9:44 am

It can be hard to agree with what Texans or New Yorkers have to say about our fair state, but Lawrence Wright, a Texan who writes for the New Yorker, isn't exactly wrong when he observes:

Plymouth Rock has to be one of the most unremarkable artifacts of American history.

By adamg - 9/5/22 - 9:20 pm
Couple getting married at a church in Jamaica Plain

In 1962, Edmund L. Mitchell captured a bride being escorted into church in Jamaica Plain as a couple of streetcars passed by.

By adamg - 8/29/22 - 12:11 pm
Street in old Boston

The folks at the Boston City Archives wonder if you can place this scene. See it larger.

By adamg - 8/11/22 - 12:29 pm
What's left of 19th century house on Centre Street, with backhoe on top

The remains of the house.

A contractor for local developer Gary Martell's CAD Builders this morning tore down the Greek-revival Keith House on Centre Street to make way for a 21-unit condo building - assuming the project is approved by the BPDA - just two days after ISD issue a demolition permit. Read more.

Ad:
By adamg - 8/8/22 - 9:46 pm

NPR reports David McCullough died Sunday at his home in Hingham.

By adamg - 8/3/22 - 9:42 am

Footage of The Rat and Pizza Pad in 1985 (We Don't Knock clip)

James Harold, 79, of Medford, was owner of the Rat in Kenmore Square, in the pre-BU, pre-hotel era, when Mr. Butch held court and Deli Haus served breakfast late into the night. He died Sunday at 79.

Let's Go to the Rat - a documentary.

By adamg - 8/1/22 - 10:27 am

The State Library of Massachusetts posts a copy of an 1847 broadside ad for what we'd now call a subdivision in Woburn:

It boasts that the lots for sale are within a three-minute walk of the train depot, with trains to and from Boston stopping at the station 18 times per day, as well as nearby churches, good schools, and a thriving village. Who wouldn’t want to live near all of these amenities! The lots were good-sized, too, ranging from 6,000 to 15,000 feet and located near Wedge Pond.

By adamg - 7/25/22 - 9:55 am
Bunting on a building in old Boston

The folks at the Boston City Archives wonder if you can place this image (which has the street name blacked out). See it larger.

By adamg - 7/22/22 - 3:40 pm
Penn Central 3182 on Southeast Expressway in 1969

Then: Engine 3182 stuck on and in the Expressway.

On Aug. 21, 1969, three locomotives being readied to haul freight to Albany, NY escaped what is now the Cabot Yard in South Boston and barreled right into the Southeast Expressway, carving deep grooves in the roadway before they came to a halt and blocking northbound traffic.

Michael William Sullivan reports that the lead locomotive in the runaway express remains on the rails and doing hard work, now down in New Jersey. Read more.

By adamg - 7/18/22 - 11:50 am
Removing trolley tracks from Broadway in South Boston

Lemon Genesis: Citrus Awakening watched workers remove streetcar tracks that had long lain dormant under West Broadway in South Boston.

By adamg - 7/13/22 - 11:18 am
Part of the Cortes letter

Part of the letter. Note how the bottom right appears to have been torn off.

The federal government is moving to seize a document purportedly signed by Hernán Cortés in 1527 that may have been stolen from a Mexican government archive before it wound up for sale by a North End-based auction house last month - a sale the firm agreed to halt after being contacted by the FBI. Read more.

By adamg - 7/7/22 - 10:53 am
Boris Johnson on the T

As Garrett Quinn reminds us, there's always a Massachusetts connection. In 2015, then London Mayor Boris Johnson came to town for some conference at Harvard, and got on the Red Line for the trip across the river. But it was the middle of one of our blizzards that year, so he wound up having a chat with some random chap at Park Street.

By adamg - 7/5/22 - 12:11 pm
Building with Chiclets for sale

The folks at the Boston City Archives wonder if you can place this scene. See it larger.

By adamg - 7/4/22 - 8:48 pm

Nowadays, he's mostly remembered as "Silent Cal," but the fact that he's remembered for anything is because he became president on the backs of Boston Police officers, whose strike he broke in 1919 by calling in National Guardsmen, who shot into a crowd, killing five.

More on the strike.

H/t Brad.

By adamg - 6/23/22 - 3:07 pm

The Supreme Judicial Court ruled today that a woman who sued Harvard University both to gain possession of four daguerreotypes of two of her ancestors ordered stripped half naked in 1850 by professor Louis Agassiz, whose contributions to geology were matched by the depths of his racism, has no right to the images, but that she does have the right to try to convince a jury that Harvard committed "negligent and indeed reckless infliction of emotional distress" by continuing to use the images for its own purposes even after she objected. Read more.

By adamg - 6/22/22 - 11:10 am
Rendering of proposed new USS Constitution entrance

NPS rendering.

The National Park Service has proposed changes to the Charlestown Navy Yard that would include replacing the large, vacant Hoosac Stores warehouse next to the USS Constitution site with a new museum and visitor center. Read more.

By adamg - 6/15/22 - 2:07 pm

The City Council today approved a resolution to "acknowledge, condemn and apologize for the role played by the city of Boston in the trans-Atlantic slave trade and the ongoing detrimental impacts experienced by the Black people of Boston." Read more.

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