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Another Boston cop charged in Hyde Park overtime scandal

A former BPD officer who worked at the scandal-ridden Hyde Park evidence warehouse was formally charged Friday with participation in the warehouse's bogus-overtime scam.

At the same time that the US Attorney's office filed an "information" against Joseph Nee, 48, in federal court, it also filed a plea agreement in which Nee agreed to plead guilty to one count of conspiracy to commit theft concerning programs receiving federal funds and one count of embezzlement from an agency receiving federal funds. A sentencing date was not set.

According to the feds, Nee joined other officers and superiors in filing for hours they did not work, often by leaving overtime shifts earlier than indicated on their time slips. Nee admitted he earned $12,136 extra this way between January, 2015 and August, 2017.

In 2017, the last year for which he worked the entire year, Nee earned a total of $111,536.76 as an officer, according to city payroll records.

Nee is the 13th BPD employee charged in the scandal. The US Attorney's office says the investigation is continuing.

Innocent, etc.

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Comments

I presume that Maura Healey is running for governor. Will she be asked why the state is no where to be found in these investigations?

It seems like the Globe breaks the news and the feds prosecute. Where is Healey on this public corruption?

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Voting closed 49

Why and where is the unbelievable presence and help of the untouchable BPD union? That’s correct the president of that union I believe is under indictment for sexually abusing young children of trusted individuals along with young children he called Family!!!

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Not to defend him or anything, but he hasn't been union president since 2018.

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This is just stupid. The BPD themselves were the one who broke the case - as its a federal crime, involving defrauding the federal government for benefits, the US Attorney and FBI are leading the prosecution and investigation.

This is just a completely ignorant and dishonest attack, for basically no reason other than you don't want Healy to beat Charlie Baker. Which, okay, fine. But no need to spread lies about it.

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Voting closed 17

There are state crimes present here and in the host of other public corruption scandals. Healey has jurisdiction to prosecute. Why hasn't she?

Also, FWIW, I don't want Baker to beat Healey. I do, however, want all candidates thoroughly vetted.

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Voting closed 14

I do, however, want all candidates thoroughly vetted.

What does this mean? How was Charlie Baker "thoroughly vetted"?

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Asking our top prosecutor to do her job or explain why she doesn't think this is worthy of her time is entirely unrelated to what I think of Charlie Baker.

Look for my comments on Baker next time we're discussing his lies about meeting Bennett Walsh or Baker's failure to do anything about the state police.

If you bring up Baker one more time, I'll have to assume you have nothing to say in Healey's defense on this matter.

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Voting closed 18

You raise a valid question, but at this point, it is simply an unanswered question. Is the AG's office investigating these crimes, either independently or in conjunction with the feds? If not, why?

I'm interested in the answer to these questions myself, but until they are answered, we can only speculate and I don't really care to do that.

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Voting closed 15

For every case of corruption we find there are lots of them we don't .
It takes the Feds to uncover it around here it seems.

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And told someone who told the feds.

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But the honor system isn't a reliable method of oversight considering this had gone on for years.

The more important question is why are these people needed at all if they can cut out on their shifts for years without anyone noticing.

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Voting closed 40

It's just that no one knows how much needs to be done and how long it takes, etc etc. Also hard when the supervisors are in on the scam.

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Voting closed 20

Also hard when the supervisors are in on the scam.

More bad apples, whaddya know.

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But the honor system isn't a reliable method of oversight considering this had gone on for years.

Its corruption from the top down, if the supervisors are in on the scam. It shows a culture when it works that way...one day the ones on the bottom will be supervisors and it continues.....like they were taught.

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Voting closed 30

1. Someone is always there to report a scam like this.
2. This is a scam that is easily uncovered (alarm times).

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I'm sure this and other scams have gone on for years and years because it's just taxpayers money after all.
If it was a private company it would be uncovered a lot quicker. I bet.
I definitely dont think every BPD employee is corrupt but it looks like they have a culture of corruption problem.
When someone makes a huge amount in overtime I'm automatically suspicious

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Voting closed 20

Having a police badge doesn’t equal intelligence either. Where else can a dummy who barely passed high school and has no skills make 200k per year? They are already the most overpaid profession in America yet they think they are entitled to more so they steal from taxpayers.

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In whatever suburb you grew up in Klino, but here you need a bachelors degree of military service. And 75% of officers actually have their masters degrees because it helps on promotional exams and covered by the Quinn bill for extra pay. Whoops!

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And what degree do you hold? I know police and fire have to pass an exam (have you passed one for your job?)...if you are in trouble would you call a college graduate to save you??? What about billionaires who drop out of college? Seriously if you haven’t sinned go ahead and continue to through stones...

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Voting closed 15

Wait, are we supposed to call Bill Gates when our house is on fire?

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Voting closed 14

if you are in trouble would you call a college graduate to save you???

I mean, why not? Being a college graduate certainly doesn't preclude you from being useful in any "trouble" situation that I can think of, and if the trouble is something like "I need an energy efficient building designed" or "I need a cancerous tumor removed", I'll take the college grad.

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But private companies can also offer incentives to work harder, produce more, promote based on work, etc. Police jobs can't do that. And if you through in a grant like this it gives scammers more of an opportunity to scam.

Reminds me of a time when I worked for a demolition company way back when. We had a job ripping out drywall and metal studs at an office park in Cambridge. A group of us pulled down about 5 rooms of drywall/studs before lunch when the boss came up to us and told us we were working too fast and the bid for the job required us to last two weeks and we needed to slow down. So we slowed down and took extra breaks, probably something these scammers should have done.

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I just drove by two cops on Centre street in Dorchester, they are inside the barriers of a work site watching a guy dig a trench. (The road is barely wide enough for two way traffic and they have cones up for the drivers to figure it out on their own)
That detail money is a good incentive not to steal on overtime slips, you can't do details if you're fired.

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Voting closed 17

A group of us pulled down about 5 rooms of drywall/studs before lunch when the boss came up to us and told us we were working too fast and the bid for the job required us to last two weeks and we needed to slow down.

Sounds like it was a T&M bid (time and materials) rather than lump sum. And there was no oversight to make certain people weren't loafing. If it were lump sum, getting the work done faster would make more money for the company.

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Voting closed 20

It was a sub contractor for a larger GC. And I remember our boss telling us to take an hour lunch, not 30 minutes. I remember going over to the Aku Aku in North Cambridge at the buffet and they had this soft serve ice cream machine that was all you could eat!

Anyway we didn't work as fast or as hard as we could per order of the boss. And that didn't always help because part of the job was putting on polyester suits with masks as we pulled out thousands of feet of insulation at 100 degrees. It was a job that you wanted to get in and out of, not stall.

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Voting closed 14

My private sector job has never offered me an cash incentive to work harder. I work hard because I generally like the company and I take pride in my job.

Part of why I'm skeptical of unions for professional organizations is that they deincentivize working harder by ensuring everyone gets the same benefits irrespective of how much effort they apply.

And yes, I too worked for a union job once in which I was told slow down. (Although it was by the older guys, not the boss.)

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Voting closed 19

But you can also go somewhere else and in most jobs the better you are, the more opportunities there are for you in general.

There are also some jobs that people do because they love the job and the money is a secondary issue.

Don’t disagree with you about unions, but they are a response to aggressive capitalist greed or other bully type management processes.

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Voting closed 19

You have never worked in the private sector, have you?

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Read what I wrote lbb. There are many jobs that people do because they love them, there are others where making money is the goal. Most jobs in life are ones where the better you are at them, the more money you can make.

Am I wrong? What do you do and why can't you advance or make more money?

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Voting closed 15

Most jobs in life are ones where the better you are at them, the more money you can make.

Leaving aside the fact that opportunity is absolutely not distributed equitably, Pete - are you unaware of the situation of wage stagnation in the United States over the past couple of decades? Were you working in the private sector at this time?

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Voting closed 15

I bought and sold real estate and rented out properties etc. I've done pretty well there actually. But that is something I chose to do. Wouldn't call it enjoyable having to live in shitty places for 5-10 years of my life and work three jobs but I was able to come out ok.

And come on, there are plenty of people who are just good at something and have made money doing so.

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...don’t exactly have an amazing track record when it comes to corruption either.

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Voting closed 19

No argument there.

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