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The T did say one advantage of the new Orange Line cars was the doors were wide enough so if one side broke, people in wheelchairs could still get on and off

Busted doors on an Orange Line train

Finn took photos of the Orange Line train he was on today because it seemed like not a single door on the entire train had both leaves opened at once, almost as if the T were doing that on purpose.

It's almost like it's become common occurrence with the new trains.

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It's almost like it's become common occurrence with the new trains

Wrong, it is a common occurrence with the new trains.

Can they make it so when the train breaks, it still works?

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Why do the doors keep failing?

Here's a true story. I've been a transit geek since way back when. When the type 7s were about to come in, I stopped by the State Transportation Library after school and had a very cool conversation with the librarian there. He mentioned the difference between the doors on the new trains and the LRV doors. Kinki Sharo, in his estimation, designed their doors to avoid the failures of the earlier models by basically making them simpler. And sure enough, when the LRVs went through their mid life rebuild, they installed the newer doors.

As mentioned earlier, it's not necessarily the designer, as the new New York trains are having similar issues. It feels like doors are not something that gets the level of scrutiny during the design process that things like motors get, but here we are with broken doors on new trains.

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Wider doors are also heavier doors, perhaps it is causing more wear and tear issues with the moving mechanical parts than anticipated when designed.

With little or no experience in train manufacturing, working for a Chinese company, might result in quality issues? Did anyone think about that.

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Is an unusual width the reason they break so often?