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Wu considering vaccine requirement for indoor venues

As Covid-19 cases rise, WGBH reports Wu is looking at requiring proof of vaccination as an entry requirement for restaurants, theaters and clubs.

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This should have been done at the state level and should have been done months ago, but hopefully some coordination w/Cambridge, Somerville, etc, can establish some uniformity.

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And had it been done at the state level, you would have said it should have been done at the city level. The Covid has proven the adage, dammed if you do, dammed if you don't.

If it had been done at the state level, I wouldn't have been sitting here for months wondering why Charlie Baker keeps getting praised to the heavens for not lifting one finger more than necessary through this whole ordeal.

But yes, this should have been done at the local level, along with the state and federal level.

Charlie Baker's modus operandi in any and all situations -- and yet he has immense support (even from Democrats -- especially our legislative leaders). Totally mystifying.

Spittle, meet ocean.

Go do some real work, Michelle. Seriously, this city's electorate (well, the meager percentage who gave a crap) fell for a fraud. Again.

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So if most of us are vaxxed, then yeah, why not penalize the shitheads (presumably like you) who didn't get the shot because of their freedoms?

She's been in office for 8 days. Truly amazing you can get your pants on in the morning with your intellectual powers.

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Both Pfizers in May at the Hynes, in an example of government actually getting something right in the form of an efficiently-run mass vaccination scheme.

Wu could have just said "I'll suggest that venues require proof," and that would have been good, well-intentioned governance. But no, it has to be a fight.

As for her having been in office for eight days, what's your point? She could have just kept her mouth shut and not announced this. She got the job.

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But no, it has to be a fight.

Is that the sound of a stone being thrown from a glass house? I believe it is.

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I don't take your money to participate in fights.

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Isn't it time for you to stop concerning yourself with Boston, move to New Hampshire and live your dreams?

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How tolerant and progressive of you.

Life is beautiful when I get to live better than your kind. Happy Thanksgiving!

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Don't you live in the 413?

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And I don't get a case of the libertarian ass about what the mayor of Boston is doing (even though I work there). Next question?

To your credibility, then.

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Perhaps Mr. LaTulippe, who is a resident of Boston, might have a tiny bit more concern of the goings on of Boston than someone who isn't.

In short, worry about your own town/county/metropolitan area before you start throwing your rocks at Boston. We can take care of ourselves, thank you very much.

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seems to be, in part, that the people who elected Wu (64% of those who voted in the election?) were duped into voting for someone who would take actions such as the one we are discussing. But did you read the story Adam linked to?

Wu's statements built off an idea she mentioned in a late-October appearance on Boston Public Radio, before she was elected mayor. At the time, she said the city should require proof of vaccination at such venues to protect people in high-risk indoor settings, and to support individual establishments that might find it challenging to implement their own requirements unilaterally.

This is entirely the sort of stuff she said she was in favor of before the voters decided. Don't you just hate when elected officials keep their promises?

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The Bears are who we thought they were. We crowned her ass.

That she's not making public health policies optional? That's not how good public health policy works. If it was up to the venues, then we're rewarding the people and business owners who think this is all fake and that endangers the rest of us.

Should restaurants also get to opt out of refrigerating chicken if they want because YOLO?

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They make $0 off a sickened customer.

I understand that not everyone is a rational actor at all times, but the restaurant folks I know have their heads on pretty straight when it comes to not getting customers sick. If they think that serving the unvaxxed is a problem, then they won't do it.

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but the ISD restaurant inspection records are public info and suggest that perhaps some restaurants would not be properly refrigerating chicken if not for the health inspector that caught it at one of the required twice per year inspections.

https://www.cityofboston.gov/isd/health/mfc/Default.aspx

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Refrigerating chicken costs money. Caring about whether the chicken is kept at the right temperature costs money. A sick customer could have gotten sick anywhere and doesn't know how well I do or don't store my chicken so they likely won't ever stop coming to my restaurant until they've gotten sick numerous times and figure out the pattern all on their own (same as every other customer having to figure it out all on their own). Besides, not every piece of unrefrigerated chicken instantly makes every person sick, so there are plenty of times people will eat here without getting sick or dying and pay me the same price I'm charging now, but my power bill will drop exponentially because I never turn the fridges on.

...and that's why we have ISD.

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The customer bought chicken from them in this scenario. So they made a chicken sale.

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Why would a restaurant not refrigerate chicken?

They make $0 off a sickened customer.

Failing to refrigerate chicken saves money; it only costs money if you're caught. The world seems to be full of people who are pretty sure they'll never get caught.

The entire reason we have food safety laws and occupational safety laws is that enough people have demonstrated, over and over and over again, with predictably tragic consequences, that they don't in fact have their heads on straight about protecting the health and safety of their customers and employees.

Upton Sinclair's The Jungle, anyone?

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Name a more iconic duo.

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Both Pfizers in May at the Hynes, in an example of government actually getting something right in the form of an efficiently-run mass vaccination scheme.

This was a failure of government that got covered up by people in Massachusetts generally being smart enough to want to get vaccinated. The fact that we still had people getting vaccinated in May, when other states had extra doses in March, is not proof of an efficient government. It's proof that Charlie Baker used the vaccination process to bypass public health departments which were largely prepared for it, and used it to help some private entities line their own pockets. It also set us back several weeks; for quite some time we were at the bottom of the pile for vaccination administration last spring.

But, sure, blame the mayor who has been in office for (shuffles papers) a week. Always easier than blaming a white guy.

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Baker sucks too. Stick your race card you know where.

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you have the most superficial criticisms.

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I don't think he's cynical, just dumber than a bag of hammers.

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to be both.

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Right, so 2 million people are walking around unvaccinated. 30% of the population is more than enough to maintain high transmission rates which means prolonging the pandemic. For most diseases herd immunity only takes affect with vaccination rates of 90%+.

Are under the age of 18 yo. It's terrible, I'm going to have to explain to my 6 year old, he can no longer go out clubbing and to dinner with his friends.

It's going to be a tough, but necessary talk!

If the police can't even enforce mask requirements on the MBTA how can we expect a hostess to enforce vaccine passports.

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You require an ID or vax card, if someone doesn't provide it, you tell them you can't serve them. This isn't anything new.

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Speaking of restaurants only, it's been my experience that very little in the way of enforcement has been done during the multiple mask mandates, including the current one, where the only folks wearing masks are either frontline employees or those who are confused about the rules. Not sure how a vaccine mandate would work under these circumstances when the community as a whole has already accepted the ~800K deaths, 19K in Massachusetts alone, as the cost of doing business.

While I'd like to believe that most people would like to see an end to this health crisis, we have to take into consideration that going forward, a certain demographic will be the majority of cases for those contracting the virus, becoming ill and unfortunately dying and I highly doubt a bureaucratic solution to their stupidity can be either implemented or enforced when this is exactly what they want.

Instead of placing the burden of enforcement on the small business owners, we need to turn to the state, who has the power to enact equitable legislation that has actual teeth other than being turned away from one restaurant only to be accepted at another. We all know that in a consumer driven society money talks, so let's start withholding tax refunds, unemployment checks, lottery winnings, licenses and permits, access to services and transportation and/or many of the other benefits we derive from the state to those who refuse the vaccine.

We'll see how fast the immutable adult children find themselves rethinking their position and joining those who've either always believed a vaccine and masking was the solution or who've seen the light after getting over their mild bout of skepticism. I'm betting that the conversion rate will be a lot higher than those whose employment depended on it.

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What about schools? (Also a question for Gov. Baker.)

and probably many other places, but those are the only ones I've visited so far this fall in Boston.

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I went to the Jason Isbell show but he was requiring it of all venues but pretty sure the Wang would have been checking anyway too.

also The Sinclair, O'Brien's, and Brighton Music Hall, to name another three.

This is great, and will allow me to feel comfortable doing indoor dining. I've been to a show and museums (Harvard art) that require it and am looking forward to supporting restaurants in the winter now that outdoor diving is becoming more limited. Great news! Thank you Wu!

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It was only a year and half ago that Michelle Wu and other officials went to dim sum to support Chinatown restaurants hurt by fear of coronavirus.

Dining out is already far safer today than it was in February 2020. Why all the fear?

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Back then you basically could not have been believed to be infected with this virus unless you had just traveled back from Wuhan on a doorknob licking tour.

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Can I be a stop on one?

the knob part covered.

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