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Somebody took the time to move a halal restaurant's trash to its roof in East Boston - and a prayer rug

Yahya Noor, owner of Tawakal Halal Cafe, 389 Maverick St. in East Boston's Jeffreys Point neighborhood, reports that sometime between 10:30 p.m. on Sunday, when the restaurant closed up, and Monday morning, somebody emptied its three trash bins and hefted all the trash to the roof - and then left a prayer rug next to the trash.

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Comments

Makes sense they'd be interested in moving around a bunch of trash, being a garbage person themselves.

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Voting closed 46

Mr Noor is a he.

I have not been to Tawakal, but people whose opinions I trust say uniformly that the food is delicious.

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Voting closed 36

Yahya is a male name

(my former intern's name was Yahya)

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Voting closed 19

Yahya is just Arabic for John.

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Voting closed 18

Thanks.

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Voting closed 18

This is horrible to hear. He is a friend and a neighbor of mine and does more for the communities of Chelsea and East Boston than you could ever imagine. It is a lovely little restaurant and I encourage people to stop by and pick up lunch, dinner or even some of his custom bottled hot sauce to show him support.

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Voting closed 68

This is confusing to hear. Does putting someone's trash bags on their roof mean something? or is it just random mischief?

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Voting closed 29

like the business is trash and the prayer mat is placed where the trash would go.

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Voting closed 34

It can be a good thing.

Perhaps you should learn more about Islam before playing the "I'm just asking a question" game.

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Voting closed 29

It doesn't really require any special cultural literacy at all to arrive at the assumption that putting trash on someone's roof is probably not a friendly gesture..........

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Voting closed 44

The fact that the trash bags are perfectly intact makes me wonder if this was a weird prank (like students putting random crap atop buildings with domed roof) as opposed to a hate crime. If it was a cheese pizza on a roof, I'd get that reference. But still, I don't get trash bags.

I admit I don't know much about Islam, but since trash bags didn't exist 1500 years ago I don't expect there's a canonical reference to it.

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Voting closed 29

It may just be a prank, but if I threw a cross and a bunch of trash bags onto a Christian business in predominantly Muslim country, it would probably be interpreted as being religiously related.

Obviously, it might not be. However, there's not really any reason to believe it's "just a prank" either. I don't know exactly why placing garbage bags and a prayer rug is the kind of thing you would do to offend a Muslim, but I'm not the sort of person that would want to do that in the first place. Generally, trash on a rough isn't a friendly gesture.

I don't know for sure that this is a religiously motivated act, but putting a prayer rug and trash on the roof of a Muslim owned building doesn't really seem like parking a car on the MIT dome (or whichever random thing it might be). If I'm being honest, it seems like far more of a stretch to see that relationship than to see it as an attack on the person's religion. Of course, both could be wrong, but it seems like a more reasonable assumption to think this was meant to be rude (and in particular relating to religion), and not a friendly prank.

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Voting closed 33

Duh. Putting trash bags next to a prayer rug is intently trying to make a statement. That’s some premeditated shit

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Voting closed 40

I think the prayer rug makes it more personal and religious.

Either way it's still not a friendly neighborly thing to do. Supporting him and his business is something that I would suggest even if this had not happened. He pays into the community tremendously.

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Voting closed 31

Owners of this place are absolute beauties. This is pretty enraging.

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Voting closed 40