Hey, there! Log in / Register

Citizen complaint of the day: Cutest menace ever in North End community garden

Menacing gopher

A concerned citizen files a 311 complaint about a havoc-wreaking gopher at DeFilippo Park in the North End:

There is a gopher in the new community garden at DeFilippo Park on Prince Street in the North End. It is deeply affecting the life of the garden, and we would like it to be captured and released in another area please.

Neighborhoods: 

Ad:
Like the job UHub is doing? Consider a contribution. Thanks!

Comments

VARMINT!

up
Voting closed 16

Her mother... sent her to us for the summar.

up
Voting closed 10

Do gophers even live in New England? Perhaps this is a woodchuck?

up
Voting closed 23

You're right but for the wrong reason. Gophers are endemic in the US. However, gophers have hairless tails and woodchucks have fuzzy ones. That is certainly not a gopher tail in the picture.

Can't tell from the picture how big it is but gophers top out around 2 pounds and woodchucks get to 12-13 pounds.

up
Voting closed 19

there are many gofers.

up
Voting closed 13

I spent a good chunk of my childhood (in the Hudson Valley) around woodchucks, and although the critter in the photo is partially obscured, my first thought was "Ain't no gopher." They can be pretty destructive: A family of 'chucks took up residence under my mother's sauna and deck, and chewed it all up pretty bad.

up
Voting closed 17

Woodchucks are also called groundhogs. Here's a discussion of groundhogs, woodchucks, and gophers.

As a child, I once tried to pet a gopher. Big mistake. It attached itself to my finger and wouldn't let go. A neighbor hit it so it released me. I still have the scar.

up
Voting closed 14

I agree. It's a woodchuck.

up
Voting closed 10

Everyone wants the cute rodents removed and "relocated" but you can only relocate on the same property or kill them.

From mass.gov:

Massachusetts law prohibits the capture and relocation of wildlife off your property. This law has been in effect for many years. This is meant to keep both wildlife and people safe.

https://www.mass.gov/service-details/moving-wildlife

Woodchucks:
https://www.mass.gov/service-details/learn-about-woodchucks

up
Voting closed 19

“Relocating wildlife” is a misleading phrase that placates the conscience of those who don’t know or are in denial of the fact that it most often means a cruel death not only for the trapped animal but for any babies that depend on it.
Euthanasia in a vet’s office is kinder.

up
Voting closed 18

Fortunately this case was resolved in the best way possible, with the animal being left in peace.

"CLOSED Case Resolved. Animal Control reports, sorry we can not remove healthy wildlife and relocate it . It's illegal to relocate wildlife in Massachusetts. - about 1 hour ago #101003846422"

up
Voting closed 36

Good news!!
Thanks.

up
Voting closed 16

Who is the worse menace? The creature with the low carbon footprint or the one with the infinitely larger one?

up
Voting closed 28

Seriously. Take a step back and look at the options.

Kill the Woodchuck, maintain the habitat, and woodchuck the second will arrive.

Meanwhile, the ravenous rabbits will eat everything for all of them.

The real answer is to take appropriate measures to screen out both of them. That means fencing off the plants.

up
Voting closed 13

... into my arms!!! So cute!!

up
Voting closed 15

years back that did a nice job of preserving nearby forest and wetlands and keeping old trees and other wild flora near the buildings. We got to watch a new family of woodchucks, mom and kits, waddling around right outside our ground-floor office windows every late spring / early summer. Them little ones were awful cute, usually five or six to the litter, and grew really fast. No nearby vegetable gardens to ravage.

up
Voting closed 19