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The vaccine rollout at Mass. General and Brigham and Women's wasn't the smoothest

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But our so called leaders in congress and the senate getting vaccinated first was shameless.

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Voting closed 19

First, the numbers: There are only 535 members of Congress. That's a drop in the bucket for the number of healthcare workers getting vaccinated even in just the first round.

Second, the image benefit: If our Congresscritters get publicly vaccinated, that could lead to greater vaccination rates among the general population, including vaccine-hesitant Republicans.

Their personal motivations may not all have been pure, but the effects don't seem to be a problem.

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Voting closed 14

I agree.

It also allows for better continuity of government, which as ridiculously slow as it has been to help out the citizens they serve, is still the only mechanism by which our federal government will continue functioning and providing us some level of service.

If a doctor or nurse calls out sick today, surely their work can be covered by someone else until they are able to return, there's no such alternates for members of Congress. Yeah, sure you can say "screw them, they don't do jack shit for us" but unless you want to propose so radical changes to the US Constitution, members of Congress do hold important positions in our chosen system of government.

It is also good PR for the vaccine.

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Voting closed 14

If neither time nor money are a concern- then tests are easy to get

Otherwise- I had to cancel a medical procedure last week because the "free" tests offered in Somerville don't want appointments made more than 72 hours out and non-CHA members go to the back of the line- was going to be a 9-day wait for just the test without result wait and anything else was going to go $150-300 a pop if I could get anything in a timely enough manner

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Voting closed 13

As a nobody with no clout and no connections, I have given up any hope of being eligible for a vaccine until about 2023

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Voting closed 26

It will get better. Even the best laid plans do not always work perfectly when implemented, but from that experience, they can be corrected and optimized.

You often have a great deal of time to prepare for day 1, but you have less than a day to prepare for day 2.

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Voting closed 28

It took months for testing to become widespread but now it's not too hard to get one.

I figure the vaccine will be the same way. Between a ramp-up in production and the number of fools who will refuse to get it, I figure it will become fairly easy for anyone who wants a shot to get one by the spring.

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Voting closed 26

Between there being two types of vaccines ... working on three ... and less extreme storage and transport conditions for the latter two, we will start seeing far more facilities capable of administering vaccines. The real limit right now is the temps needed for the available vaccine which limits it to facilities that have the capability to store it. Hospitals are not usually in the business of vaccination, but pharmacies, local health departments, etc. will soon be able to up their game and handle more massive access.

MA DPH will be setting up popups and drive throughs once things get rolling.

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Voting closed 19

Three? There are dozens of vaccines out there, held up by bureaucracy. You can sign up for a drug trial if you really want one.

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Voting closed 8

I think late summer/early fall for widespread, easy availability. It's not just a question of the vaccines, it's supply-chain issues with the special glass needed for vials, as well as syringes, all of which come from other countries who justifiably prioritize their own needs and those of reasonable, rational, stable trading partners.

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Voting closed 14

Q3 availability with a better, but not unrestricted, holiday season next year (family gatherings back on, large office Christmas parties and the Pops a no go) and even more normalcy (large gatherings of some kinds, return to mostly full work and school with more safety precautions, no more travel restrictions, some form of Boston Marathon?) by sometime in 2022. Pretty heroic effort by science if it can get us out of this mess that quickly, fingers crossed.

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Voting closed 9

It’s just GBH now.

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I mean, I still call it the Hancock building.

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Voting closed 7

Which one, the old Hancock, or the Building Formerly Known as The Hancock? If you slip on the ice at either, is the closest hospital Boston City Hospital or NEMC?

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Voting closed 7