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Flooding along the coast in Scituate

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I'm wondering how much do people in Scituate pay for flood insurance.

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Their insurance is subsidized.
These houses have been destroyed and rebuilt many times, thanks to taxpayers.
Go figure.

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Just checking. I've been going near there for 30 years and have never seen one of these washed away. 1978? Yes, since then, you may be wrong.

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All that was left standing in one area of Scituate was a home that a guy pretty much had to go to the Supreme Court to build. He wanted to build to federal coastal zone management standards, but Scituate wouldn't approve it because it wasn't "traditional" and didn't "match".

It certainly didn't match when it was the only undamaged home left standing.

Scituate also fought the latest flood maps because they didn't want to pay their fair share of insurance. Every place the feds said would flood, did flood.

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Check out the way flood insurance works, dear, and try again.

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At least from what I remember from the late 60's. And these days, if they don't wash away, they definitely get damaged, and are fixed from flood insurance funds.

That's a funny road, isn't it? These few houses are at a low point, where all the others are just a bit higher.

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Sort seems like the area is designed for the area to be overrun with water. Although there are 2 houses that appear to not be on stilts.

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I see a pretty good use of eminent domain here. Seize the property, knock down the houses, and turn the land (back?) into tidal marsh land.

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Yes, I'd like to destroy someone's else's property on a whim. Let's start with Arlington Street westward and make the Back Bay a marsh again too. Let a million fry be born on what was the Commonwealth Avenue Mall!

Peggotty is a great small beach. The houses are on stilts. That is why the water runs through them.

The people there pay through the nose for flood insurance and yes there is some subsidies on flood insurance, just like I subsidize your transit fares with my sales tax purchases even though I am the only one in my family of four that takes the T.

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I subsidize your driving everywhere with my property taxes, my income taxes, fees, etc.

Don't even try to play that game. You will lose.

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If we don't start rebuilding barrier beaches and coastal marshes, there will be a whole lot more property destroyed in the long run.

Learn about coastal ecology before you run your keyboard.

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At least 500 of them in Scituate. $180K to REBUILD a house that had already been REBUILT twice.

No subsidy there. Yeah. Right.

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the MBTA = private beach house.

Totally the same in terms of how much public subsidy they should have. 100% dead on - well done.

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A subsidy is a subsidy after all.

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Half of downtown Boston is on former tidal marsh land. Good luck grad.

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You have absolutely no idea of what you are talking about.

You can learn, though. The state has extensive web resources to help you.

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Just asking.

Because there are houses in Scituate which have been substantially damaged nine times and rebuilt on our dimes.

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will have waterfront property at some point. But remember, these storms aren't happening. It's fake news spread by Al Gore. So when your wing nut neighbor commuting by kayak from his now waterfront manse complains, just smile.

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That's a dream of mine - a literal dream. I have dreamed of launching off of my property. So have several of my neighbors.

My property won't flood until we get to 15 meters of sea rise, but then I'd be on the Lawrence Peninsula extending south from Winchester, with the Bay of Brooks below.

I've long wanted to put together tourist post cards for the Seven Islands of Somerville.

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At least 6 houses where the old and inadequate (it only comes up to my thigh) seawall collapsed are now structurally unsound. Several might face demolition. Plus the Esplanade was still partially flooded this morning & all businesses closed for a third day thanks to the mess and lack of power

https://youtu.be/b2jYkQDWs1w

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Might be time for these communities to start configuring their plans for managed retreat. These really aren't buildable lots anymore. Removing what is left of these buildings and putting in natural defenses might stave off the next wave of destruction as water moves inland.

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