Hey, there! Log in / Register

The lost art of handwritten notes still alive in Cambridge

Thanks to Kevin Church for discovering this charming exchange of ideas on a Cambridge street:

Neighborhoods: 

Ad:
Like the job UHub is doing? Consider a contribution. Thanks!

Comments

If the city really removed the bike, wouldn't they take the lock they broke and throw it away, rather than let it pollute their fair city? I wonder.

up
Voting closed 0

They have been pretty good about this, and most cyclists know it. Nobody owes this person a new lock, and they can probably get their bike back if they ask nicely.

up
Voting closed 0

It's only a Cambridge thing, and the signposts are supposed to have warning signs on them stating the law. All the ones in Harvard Square do, for example.

Everyone thinks it's super OK for bikes, but if the city were impounding cars with no signage to indicate why, there'd be a shitstorm. Hell, drivers often complain that parking signs are "too confusing."

up
Voting closed 0

To not park a bike on a handicapped parking sign or near a handicapped space. People aren't required to have common sense, however. Parking meters are more sturdy for locking to than sign posts, so too are bike racks.

BTW, glad the response used the term "Bozo" instead of "Tard". "Bozo" has a local metro-Boston flavor to it, while "tard" is an un-PC way to say intellectually challenged.

up
Voting closed 0

what kind of basic bitch do you have to be to manage to bring up the fact he didnt say tard

congrats, youre so PC that you go around commending people on their word choice

fucks sake

up
Voting closed 0

Sorry the person who is disabled is bothering you. Most of us on the other hand will continue to use common courtesy and not block the ramps of those who need them. Wow.

up
Voting closed 0

I'm not sure it's blocking anything at all, but certainly not a ramp, if locked to that sign.

up
Voting closed 0

n/t

up
Voting closed 0

I don't think it's common sense at all. As a practical matter, it's highly unlikely that the bicycle was going to cause anybody any woe. This rule, like many of today's accessibility rules are completely devoid of balance and common sense. The rules set a ridiculously low lowest common denominator for everything, at great cost, on the off-chance that *someone* in a wheelchair *might* *someday* find it useful.

up
Voting closed 0

y do u hate the disabled?!!!!

--------------

In case I have to say it: Sarcasm off

up
Voting closed 0

Google it if you have issues with Strange People Speak.

up
Voting closed 0

It looks like this pole does *not* have Cambridge's typical little warning sign at eye-level saying not to lock bikes there. Anyone know where this is?

I use a wheelchair van, and when bikes have been locked to the poles, it's never been a problem. The van's wheelchair ramp is in the middle of the space, nowhere near the poles.

up
Voting closed 0

according to recent discussion of the photo on Reddit.

up
Voting closed 0

Thanks.

Here's an image of the poles: https://goo.gl/maps/2Fczg

The little signs saying "no bike parking on any handicapped sign pole" are not present.

up
Voting closed 0

How are you inferring the lock was tossed on the ground? I don't see it in the picture and the note-writer probably just assumes he'll need a new lock because they tend to get broken when forcibly removed.

up
Voting closed 0

You're right, I made an assumption. I would only ever assume my bike was stolen when I see the broken lock, since no thief would ever bother to do anything but leave it there.

So when I saw the original note, I imagined it must be the same for the note writer. But if no lock around, it's very safe to assume Cambridge took it and threw the lock away, since it would then be litter. So the stolen assumption from the note writer would be pretty unjustified if no lock.

up
Voting closed 0

Just, wow.

up
Voting closed 0

it would be nice if the cyclist left a follow-up letter apologizing for his mistake

up
Voting closed 0

...when drivers plowed into cyclists, they didn't start screaming at them about the damage to their precious little car.

How about apology notes from drivers who park in bike lanes? Bus stops? In front of fire hydrants? Blocking people's driveways?

up
Voting closed 0

You sound crazy, wicked crazy.

up
Voting closed 0

Very nice penmanship (as we used to call it) from these folks. Not something you see much of anymore. When I w as a kid it was taught in schools. I'm not sure if that's the case now.

up
Voting closed 0

Elderly and disabled rule!
Bicyclists and motorists drool.

up
Voting closed 0

Guess that guy isn't going to lock his bike at handicapped spaces again! Regardless, hope he got his bike back, though as swrrly said, he certainly is not entitled to a brand new lock.
(Cambridge signs do say handicapped, my apologies to those who disagree with the term.)

up
Voting closed 0